Monday, May 23, 2016

More Details on SPI Color Night Vision Sensor

SPI Infrared publishes few more details on its X27 4K color night vision sensor. Few statements from SPI Infrared site:

"Unlike other technologies, the x27 low light color security camera always images full 390-1200Nm without having to switch camera functions, the user always gets the full broadband.

The x27 low light color sensor has extremely large pixel pitch cells for high light gathering capabilities and is very sensitive in the IR spectra region. The high 5 Million equivalent ISO system has outstanding low lux capabilities with a whopping 85,000x luminance gain.

High definition 10 megapixel sensor works in the daytime and accepts a wide array of standard off the shelf commercially available lenses. The X27 low light sensor produces 4K high definition color imagery even at 1 millilux low light levels.

The x27 low light color security camera vastly outperforms any exsisting low light color technology like CMOS, Scmos, CCD, EMCCD, EBAPS and traditional military grade intensified technologies.

Current day CMOS extreme low light color sensors reach a peak maximum quantum detection limit, an inevitable quality to these sensors are RGB or color filters that must reside on the sensor to produce a nice color image, along with other filters that enhance color image quality. These filters cut down photons and sensitivity dramatically, but must be present to produce a nice color image. The Solid-state x27 color low light night vision sensor utilizes specialty video processing on chip and on the filters, as well as advanced electronic vis-nir image enhancement algorithms that allow it to collect an incredible amount of light, and retain full sensitivity without loss of a brilliant color image, furthermore the x27’s BSTFA (Broad Spectrum Thin Film Array) high fidelity, large pixel pitch sensor architecture achieves incredible bright as day, true color imagery at real time full tv frame rates, without image lag and minimal image noise or grain.

Another drawback to traditional sensors is the infrared cut filter, this filter sits in front of the sensor and cuts out all infrared wavelengths which is needed for a good color image. By cutting out the infrared spectrum from the sensor, the camera does not pick up infrared signals which have added benefits to a good night vision image and also cuts the ability to see infrared lasers, pointers, Illuminators and designators. The removal of the infrared cut filter from traditional sensors produce a pink/red image and displays a non optimal picture. The specialized x27 sensor sees well into the infrared region as well as produces a nice true brilliant color image allowing the user to see a full broadband extended dynamic range image that includes visible to infrared wavelengths. The x27 outperforms any low light technology in existence today within the visible to SWIR spectral region.

Back side illumination of chip technology is another area that allows the chip to output higher performance in low light, the x27’s color night vision detectors bsi backside illumination is yet another aspect that makes it desirable for Imaging at never before seen extreme low light conditions. The x27 ultra extreme low light color night vision complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit (IC) is a vital proven technology.
"

Preliminary Technical Specifications:
  • Sensor & Parameters: Maintenance free, no moving parts, Solid State non intensified BSTFA Extreme low light color FPA w/column amplification
  • Large Format, large pixel pitch architecture w/5,000,000 equivalent ISO
  • Backside Illuminated for light utilization efficiency
  • Extreme low SNR – High Dynamic Range, Photoconductive & photoresponse gain
  • Very high ISO w/Extremely Low read Noise
  • Auto Black Level Calibration
  • Auto Exposure w/excellent color fidelity
  • Excellent image uniformity
  • Auto hot pixel correction
  • Frame Rate: 60 FPS / optional 120 FPS
  • Day Night Mode: Auto Imaging/Auto Switching
  • Bright light/Blooming compensation: Automatic
  • Photodetector Array Size: 10 Megapixel / HD 4320 x 2432
  • Temperature Range: -30C to +80C
  • Wavelength: 390-1200 Um broadband Extreme High Sensitivity
  • IR Response: Yes

Here is one of the recent Youtube demos showing the sensor's night vision capabilities:

80 comments:

  1. This camera is quite intriguing, the ability to match or as it seems in this case, exceed the low light capabilities of i2 devices in colour is indeed a milestone in low light level imaging. I saw many of spi's videos but this one;

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&persist_app=1&v=RyZiZsQRmOM

    Caught my attention as it has a side by side comparison of the color night vision camera next to a gen 3 image intensified device. Very impressive and seems to be clocking in at 60 fps real time.

    Device looks big but I can see it implemented in many security/defense applications.

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    1. This looks like a very well constructed system, it seems to be like the new CANON ME20F-SH, which I have been tracking for over 2 years, The CANON ME20F-SH has been in the works for a while and has really nice features much like this x27. Kudos to this technology evolving, the industry has been lacking good low light color cameras for some time, emccd's are also getting to be really sensitive as well.

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    2. Very nice camera, looks like the CANON ME20F-SH, canon has been working on the ME20F-SH camera for over 2 years.

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    3. The SPI x27 I believe is using a new type of 10 megapixel 18um pitch HbCMOS color low light detector with some image processing, it's those large micron pitch pixels that produce such a nice image in extreme low light nights.

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    4. HbCMOS sensors are quite rare but do have outstanding low light gathering capabilities, that would make sense. I have browsed through the many videos the SPI company presents on YouTube with the x27 camera, while quite shaky, the videos are very impressive, specifically the ones filmed in moonless starlit nights

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    5. Saw this video, looks like daytime, had it not been for the stars in the sky, I would have thought It was filmed in the day,

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=h_Vyxnwc6mc



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    6. Theoretically speaking, you can see stars during daytime if you use a long focal length like telescope. Since the background is reduced by larger F number, but the star brightness is fixed only by the lens diameter can be kept constant.

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    7. I have actually use the canon ME20F for underwater photography in low light, we packaged the camera inside a very nice waterproof housing and went to town with it, it proved to work exceptionally well and satisfied our need, would like to try the X27 in the same scenario

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    8. I see a clear advantage for many useful applications like security, law enforcement, Astronomy and documentary work. For practical needs I don't know what the upper 1200 mm wavelength the x27 camera has to offer can assist for general use, but for military units, the ability for infrared detection us crucial. Quite nice that this unit wil see in the IR spectrum, the 1064 micrometer laser has a desirable advantage to military folks, That ability to see it is good, night vision and traditional sensors don't sense that high in the wavelength. I wonder if the x27 can also see UV

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    9. Looks like a very capable instrument. I would like to see what products evolve from this camera.

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    10. Glad to see some good colour low light cameras finally available, for the longest time I have been told that there are colour cameras with very good performance, they never work out to perform any better than generation 1 old Vietnam technology, after viewing a few of the videos, I have to say that there finally is some high end cameras now available. I would love to see one in live operation. BTW Has anyone seen or used EBAPS low light technology?

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    11. EBAPS is I believe essentially an intensified camera (a really nice one). I have seen limited footage and it is darn good, The approach is an image sensor coupled with night vision technology bonded togather with some powerful software driving the entire system, somehow the intensification is better than i2 tubes, it's limited to government agencies and special program type offices. This is one technology that I would love to get in my hands, it is used in rotary wing imaging systems and other vision enhancement systems. Quite expensive though.

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    12. You should stop sending your comments here since you have no clue on night vision sensors by confusing EBAPS with ICMMOS/ICCD.

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    13. What is icmmos?

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    14. 2 weeks ago, we go to demonstrate the ME20F, it was a moonless evening with some clouds. I was truly impressed with the image, I expected it to work marginally ok but it was a very useful image, you could make out subtle objects in a very low light environment. I am intrigued by the x27, it looks like it would do a similar job to the canon. The large arrays with huge pixels really make a difference, I would love to see the aurora borealis with these type of systems, that would be stunning.

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    15. I have never heard of icmmos?

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    16. Travis ideally it would be great to have this camera as a module or as a viewer with very high resolution displays to compensate for the high-resolution of the detector. The X27 specs state 10 megapixel sensor with 19 µm pixels, From what I understand the highest resolution OLED available out there is about two megapixel this system coupled with telephoto zoom lenses would be pretty cool, astro photography and documentary type arenas would benefit from this.

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    17. My group uses HbCMOS in laboratory settings we never have used it and a security type apparatus but from initial testing it definitely does very well in low light environments as this is the type of situation we were getting close door in laboratory settings we never have used it and a security type apparatus but from initial testing it definitely does very well in low light environments, the 10 mpx sensor of the x27 is quite large in size then, Believe the Hbmos we are using is 5 mpx

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    18. Very impressive indeed, the need for a true real time colour night imager is out there

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    19. I think the gentleman is referring to Scmos which is scientific CMOS essentially a more sensitive higher performing cmos sensor, the x27 is using HbCMOS, the detectors sensor in the x27 are coming from ANDOR which if not mistaken was the originator of the first Scmos.

      ANDOR makes very high end imaging systems from what I can tell in thier website for lowlight and R&D applications.

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    20. The videos are quite shaky but the resolution is phenomenal and the lowlight pick up is incredible for a colour camera, I have never seen a ss colour camera that does such a good job not even in Monochrome

      brilliant

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    21. The x27 looks like it's got order of magnitude more push than emccd, emccd were good 15 years ago but state of the art sensors are getting ultra sensitive, the large pixels really suck up photons, However, despite the sensitivity under extremely low light conditions, there are a few remaining drawbacks of EMCCD technology. The amplification mechanism required to reduce the effective read noise to < 1e-, also induces an additional noise source called multiplicative noise. This effectively increases the shot noise of the signal by a factor of 1.41, which is manifested as an increase in the pixel to pixel and frame to frame variability of low light signals. The net effect of multiplicative noise is that the acquired image has a diminished signal-to-noise ratio, to an extent that the QE of the sensor can be thought to have been effectively reduced by a factor of two. For example, a QE-enhanced back-illuminated EMCCD with 90% QE has effectively 45% QE when the effects of multiplicative noise are considered. Dynamic range limitations of EMCCDs must also be considered. It is possible to achieve respectably high dynamic range with a large pixel (13 to 16 μm pixel size) EMCCD, but only at slow readout speeds. As such, higher dynamic range can only be reached at slower frame rates (or with reduced array size) with modest EM gain settings. Application of higher EM gain settings results in the dynamic range being depleted further. Sensor cost of EMCCD technology is an additional consideration, along with the practical restriction on resolution and field of view that accompanies sensor cost. Presently, the largest commercially available EMCCD sensor is a back-illuminated 1024 x 1024 pixel device with 13 μm pixel pitch, representing a 13.3 x 13.3 mm sensor area. This already carries a significant cost premium, making further expansion to multimegapixel devices a costly proposition.

      Specialty cmos sensors are winning the low light game, this x27 is a good example.

      Could you imagine seeing the aurora borealis or meteor showers with this cam.

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    22. Lol, spi's competitors and common "anonymous" haters such are posting all over and will go to extreme length to degrade the company and its products. This activity does the opposite of its intended damage.

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  2. Very impressive, fuse this sensor with thermal infrared imaging and you've got the best night vision package

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    1. The x27 low light sensor along with SWIR detector and MWIR detector fused would be eye popping

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    2. What is the max wavelength of swir cameras? Do they work good for night vision?

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    3. SWIR cameras are mostly monochrome sensors but are available in color and they work from around 0.9 to 1.7 microns, they are getting quite better as time progresses, they have a unique space in defense applications and have the ability to see 1500 lasers which are used in defense. SWIR can cut through the atmosphere and see through fog and haze, they are very useful in night vision applications and have good low light properties, SWIR unlike LWIR can see through glass. There are many SWIR cameras available and I have also seen them as rifle scopes types, overall SWIR is a great night vision sensor that I think peaks out at 2 microns, they are used quite extensively on uav's. One of the original sensors on the U2 spy plane was an older SWIR camera that assisted in gathering intelligence from super high altitudes. You can also use powerful1500 lasers to illuminate quite freely for added night vision and not worry about traditional night vision goggles seeing your illumination because they don't spot 1500 nanometers. A major manufacturer of SWIR is Goodrich sensors unlimited, they make top notch SWIR and have been doing it for decades.

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    4. HbCMOS are quite capable of achieving very good images in very low light conditions, I believe the sensor materials and the backend of the sensors play a role togather to produce such a nice image,

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    5. I have used EBAPS in a previous life working for a major contract or the response on them is great we used the older variants of it being the number 10 version which works good I believe now they have the number 11 variant which is close to work about 20% better we used mostly for aerial type of imaging and some ground-based but mostly airborne with some fusing with longwave infrared and other visible sensors. Ebaps by itself works very well but obviously blended with the other imaging centers works very very good and has great response the only drawback is damage by lasers and cost, they are extremely expensive

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    6. Very nice image quality, I'm surprised at the low or minimal noise produced in some of the starlight videos . At 10 megapixels that's quite a heavy image, I'm assuming that the image is binned / cropped down. its high band capabilities of 1200 nn interesting, I wonder if that waveband senses objects that emit more ir radiation

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    7. Ebaps is a very sophisticated technology that has kinda been around girls while like the other commenter mentioned, they fiber taper bond the image intensifier on to a CCD chip, the result is a monochrome night vision intensified image that goes up to 900 nm(I'm not sure if the exact number for generation3). The results are great and it turns the perhaps an analog night vision image intensifier type into a digital system that has direct connectivity, previosjy to record a night vision image, one would couple a camera directly to the back of the image tubes viewing screen abd record this way, the CCD allows for digital video output. The units are still prone to heavy damage from bright lights and laser hits

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    8. EBAPS is very intriguing technology that Is rumored to work just as good if not better that generation 3 image intensified night vision tube technology, They must work really good because they use it in the nose of the Apache and I in some other systems Worldwide for a variety of defense and Homeland security applications and it is very difficult to find any additional information about it and if you contact intevac the factory in the Bay Area, they will offer more info than what's on the website, The gentleman referring to ICC MOS probably is talking about intensified CMOS technology, I also think that you can use this technology in the daytime as well if it's gated.

      This is black an white only camera although

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    9. EBAPS is mature technology, the manufacturing process is tightly controlled in vacuum facilities, it would be quite something If intevac was to make a color EBAPS unit, color at night brings advantages especially in airborne type imaging.

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    10. The ANDOR low light cameras are typically emccd, the SPI video are not using emccd, the quality, fps and sensitivity is much better than emccd, the x27 is utilizing a high grade large pixel Scmos, with a pixel size of 19 µm, it's no wonder why they get a daytime image at night, that is a huge spec. for a 10 megapixel sensor.

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    11. EBAPS is pretty stout technology, it is said to be the best black and whit technology right now but really it has its limitations because it is a trip bonded onto the intensifier granted densifiers do give out pretty darn good image they have their drawbacks like susceptibility to extreme bright lights and if things seem super bright light sources, I guess the military likes it because they are using it a couple of different programs and one of them is in the nose of the Apache, it's just a matter of time until gets damaged especially in common warfare were lasers are being shined from everywhere

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    12. Electron Bombarded Active Pixel Sensor (EBAPS). EBAPS technology is based on use of a GaAs photocathode derived from Generation-III image intensifier technology in proximity focus with a high resolution, backside thinned, CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) imager anode. The electrons emitted by the photocathode are directly injected in the electron bombarded mode into the CMOS APS anode. In this approach low noise gain is achieved in the CMOS anode via conversion of the high energy photoelectron (1 – 2 KeV resulting from the high voltage bias applied between the photocathode and CMOS anode) to electron-hole pairs in the anode via the Electron Bombarded Semiconductor (EBS) gain process. The electrons are collected in the APS pixel and subsequently read out. The EBS gain process is inherently low noise with an excess noise factor (Kf) of less than 1.1. This is substantially less than a microchannel plate based Generation-III image intensifier (MCP, Kf of 1.8) or the avalanche gain process in an Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD, Kf of 1.4). The low noise EBS gain process eliminates the need for an MCP and enables higher SNR at the lowest light levels. This offers the possibility of higher performance for an EBAPS based camera relative to a standard Image Intensified camera based on Gen-III tube technology using an MCP for gain or EMCCD based cameras.

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    13. Pure Eye candy, I'm putting this camera on my Xmas wish list

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  3. is there anybody who has really played with?

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    1. I have seen the komuara falcon camera which is a very nice low light color imaging camera, if you go to thier website you can see some imagery of it in action, not sure how it compares to this camera but it looks like a nice system, they make it in a hand held type and a desktop type with HDMI style connect

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    2. Komomura is also a type of HbCMOS type of a system that seems to work pretty well based on the footage Presented, this particular camera I think it's been out for a couple of years with relatively good success, this particular camera I think it's been out for a couple of years with relatively good success, I have spoken with the engineers from the komomura factory which really seem to know their stuff, at the time I was interested in fairly long range color imaging and they sent me some videos they were using with some very high-powered lenses like Pentax 350 mm optics very good results in low light.

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    3. I actually don't believe that the poster that was relating to the technology behind EBAPS Was way off in his technology explanation of the Theory behind the technology, essentially EBAPS Is indeed and intensified camera to a higher level and intensified tube bonded to a CCD I believe that the company into va is indeed and intensified camera to a higher level and intensified tube bonded to a CCD I believe that the company intevac what's more enough to patent this method and now it has been winning contracts left and right with the sale of the EBAPS to all kinds of applications but in essence it is an image intensive fire fiber bonded fused tapered to a CCD with some softer behind it and with vigil output fantastic idea the results that EBAPS produce while in one room are still very stunning

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    4. This x27 would be an incredible camera for airborne Ariel imaging weather man or unmanned, I can't stress the importance to have the absolute best image quality and best resolution when navigating at night, I can see this x27 camera mounted on a pod by itself or integrated into some sort of a multi spectral system, the videos look great, I would recommend for the person filming the X 27 videos to use a tripod.

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    5. if this was monochrome, the sensor would achieve about a 40 % gain in sensitivity which would make it absolutely mental for low light, the end imagery would be astonishing.

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    6. Jack, low power monolithic high-speed analog-to-digital converters have advanced the state-of-the-art noise performance in IR sensors. This can allow BLIP-limited performance to be achieved over a broad range of operational conditions (which means that performance purely from a sensitivity standpoint has plateaued for these conditions). True 14-bit performance can be achieved at pixel rates of more than 20 megapixels per second per channel and noise floors of 0.325 count (approximately 50 μVrms), all while exposed to full-EMI

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    7. Outstanding quality, the camera looks very rugged, the high infrared response is especially beneficial to me and my application working with 1.064 ir lasers. Typical silicon sensors do not go that high, they must have a special secret sauce for peaking to 1250 nanometers, I'm sure the actual raw 10 mega pixel images are tons better than the online videos. A word,of advise to the crew filming the videos, use a tripod,
      The camera photographer is all over the place, another word of advise, I would put a standard camcorder image next to the color night shots, it's hard to envision those video are filmed at night because they really look like its daytime. It would be a nice touch for thier marketing,

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  4. Must be ITAR if it's that good. If it is on par with 3rd gen I2 it must be, or soon it will be. That might explain why there aren't that many information from people that actually got there hands on the device.

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  5. A date is also indicated on the Youtube description, 5/22. This corresponds to a full moon night and the projected shadows in the sequence seem to confirm that.

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    1. Quite an impressive camera setup, that quality with a 10 megapixel sensor @ 19 um pixels at 60 fps is desirable for R&D apps I would presume over and beyond low light night vision, I can see thus setup in a lab modul like the andor cameras. I sifted through the x27 videos on YouTube and saw moonless videos, if the dangers can sense down to 5 fps for a non live real time application, the image would be brighter than daytime in the darkest scenario.

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  6. Being a pilot that uses avs6 and avs9 aviators night vision goggles, I can envision many benefits for this camera in airborne navigation. We have a Flir pod mounted which works well, I agree with the poster that mentioned blending this sensor with Flir, that would be slick.

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    1. Fusing this X 27 sensor with some other type of low light technology would be a good overall dual detector packaging the only problem : well I guess it's not really a problem but an issue is that if you blend The X27 with thermal imaging then that would have to be mounted outside of the cockpit due to the fact that thermal imaging will not be able to see through glass which I guess is not a problem but I think there are some FAA regulations on mounting components on the exterior of aircraft, The X27 would handle stuff in the lower waveband and then the long wave infrared thermal imaging would handle the portion of the latter wavelength now if you could mount something and do three sensors one that would work in the mid wave infrared that would be a smoking hot package

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    2. This would be a nice augmented sensor for airborne imaging, with the ever growing popularity of Uav,s, the x27 would be a great day and night camera, from reading the specs this unit can be used in the day as well as no get do a single camera would do both roles, I would also include thermal as well and then you've got great detection and identification properties for airborne needs, I would like to mount something like this in my Dji phantom but it can only handle very little weight, a go pro almost kicks down its endurance substantially but for a bigger Uav thus would be great, not sure what SWIR would do for the money, it seems as SWIR is very expensive but it does cut through fig and other clutter. Also not sure what Mwir will do for uav's for the amount of money spent, Mwir is very expensive and requires the cryogenic cooler but must have some crazy added benefit over LWIR that I am not aware of

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    3. The statement made below about the filter removal is laughable, The camera is using I believe a highly modified ON semiconductors KAI-16070 image sensor. These are very nice sensors and if my memory serves me right, I believe these were made by KODAK.

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    4. Great achievement, very nice system

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    5. The KAI-16070 image sensor is a gem, with some powerful image enhancement it obviously does a phenomenal job. Kodak (now on semi) has always made creme de la creme top grade sensors

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    6. The X27 is using the KAI 16070 Sensor with lots of image processing to get those nice videos,

      I have used this chip in our R&D lab in the past and its capabilities are quite stunning. I have found that it is hard dealing with ONSEMI for buying sensors, they want to sell large quantities only, but their Kodak line of sensors such as this KAI 16070 are some of the best in the world.

      Good Job on building a camera system around the sensor. I can see many applications where this camera can beneficial.

      Cheers


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    7. Is the KIA 16070 not a CCD sensor though? X27 is claiming their sensor is CMOS.

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  7. The statement regarding photoconductive gain and thin film absorber implies an absorber like a-Se or its alloy. Is there anyone in the US working on such materials for imagers? Perhaps Trex?

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  8. My guess is that they just make a camera by using the SONY sensor in A7S and adding some tricky algo for color rendition without IR cut filter. If this is an ITAR product, then they cannot show the video on youtube at all!!

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  9. what is the image sensor in Sony A7S? imx290 ?

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    1. A7S has a 12MP sensor; IMX290 is only 2.1MP.

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  10. 11pm? A car on the road with no lights on?

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  11. https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sony.co.jp%2FSonyInfo%2FNews%2FPress%2F201603%2F16-024%2F&edit-text=

    Any link to this new camera from SONY ?

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  12. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXQ-m3h2TuA

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  13. Sony SNC-VB770 is still 409K. It will not reach Canon ME20F-SH or SPI X27 , they opened the market with 4M ISO.

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    1. 409K ISO is with IRcut color mode. If you remove the IRcut filter, you can reach easily 5M ISO without any problem. SPI X27 is a simple joke! It's a simple SONY camera.

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    2. Having been in the marketplace for low light camera, this commenter above is intriguing to me, I have spent an hour on the phone today with SPI rep and will be getting a demonstration of the x27 next week. I'm concluding this poster is either someone who does not like SPI or more likely a disgruntled competitor. Since SPI has not delivered any of these, how would you claim that thier Camera is a simple Sony? Are you a disgruntled SPI employee? It's obvious by your multiple postings you have a beef with SPI. Again reveal where you get your data, it's typical to see haters post at times which makes it fun, and does the opposite of this guys agenda. Ciao

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    3. I think that he means the camera is equipped with a SONY sensor inside. Actually there are no many choices in low light level capable sensors on the market. I don't SPI has the financial capability to develop such kind of sensor by their sales volume and development cost. So the sensor comes certainly from some common sources.

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    4. HbCMOS sensor are quite capable. I recall seeing them in action a couple of years ago and the performance was way better than I expected, they put out very good picture quality in low light, they are spendy chips but to get good picture you have to pay the Bucks, they are pretty rare as well so you don't see them often.

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    5. Lots of competitors and typical spammers of this camera and haters of Spi are continually spamming bad about the Spi company and the x27 camera, I suggest rather than talk smack, put out your product for The world to see rather than degrade companies making efforts to introduce new cameras to the marketplace, the spamming creates the opposite effect of its intended damage imho

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  14. Agreed, please post your findings after evaluating the instrument.

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    1. He will never bring anything... maybe he is from SPI :)- Since I think that this is just a markcom operation from SPI. People around me and myslef have seen all the low light cameras on the market till now, but never the "X27" (LoL) from SPI.

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  15. Clearly a competitor

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    1. you are clearly from SPI. I've nothing to do with your business.

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  16. I participated in the comparative tests gen3 and I2 and e2v EMCCD. Won EMCCD. And I can confidently say that neither of which is more sensitive than L3, e2v, has not yet been invented, as 70% of all telescopes in the world use these sensors. The e2v sensor has only one drawback, they are big, consume a lot of energy is used cooling the TEC), and this cannot be applied in portable equipment and helmet-mounted devices. With regards to the video, it was filmed under a full moon obviously, because all subjects give expressive shadows. So I don't believe in what that breakthrough. According to the film Intevac EBABS, very close in sensitivity with e2v. SWIR technology is good, (by the way, the color sensors S does not exist!!!) but do not believe the tales Goodrich, at night I see they are much worse than with 2 I2C+ while sensors are much more expensive (640*480 is about 10 thousand dollars, and the tube I2 of the 3rd generation is 1.3 K$). At the moment I'm only waiting for miracles from Sony (ISX017) and Gpixel (Gsense400BSI-TVISB). ISX017 very cheap, with quoted sensitivity will probably be able to make it to Gen 2 I2+. Gsense400BSI-TVISB approaching I2 Gen3

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  17. But if we think by the side of price-performance, SNC-VB770 wins this competition with its 7500usd price. Canon ME20F-SH is appx 20K-25K usd and I guess X27 will be 25K-20K usd.

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  18. A lot of reference to HbCMOS, what exactly is it?

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    1. HbCMOS is a highly sensitive low noise CMOS sensor, I was talking to my colleagues and the professor recently about the future of imaging systems. With the upcoming advent of new optical materials the future of exotic sensors is going to be interesting. Multi spectral cameras that rely in different lens materials make for huge systems, new lenses with common materials will allow for many wavelengths to operate on a single lens, perhaps a CMOS with a SWIR and a MWIR system all in one would be an example of a multi spectral unioptiical camera. Functionality of inputting just the right amount of energy from the selected sensors and stitching that imagery into one useful picture.

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  19. Image blending has been out for quite some time your assertion of a single lens solution for multiple sensors is ideal for small systems were space is a concern. A great system that has image of blending in it and does a really good job are the gimbal for helicopters and airplanes these generally have 4 or 5 different types of cameras along with laser rangefinder's and different lasers on board, the image quality out of these Balls is very impressive, the webcam has such imagery as seen in the video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&persist_app=1&v=XE4y3PArOmw

    Granted these balls are very expensive the image is really superb they use only the best detectors and optics in these systems .

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  20. The most distributed image blended device out there is the us army's enhanced night vision goggle or fusion goggle, this is a very slick device that's used as a head mounted system and has thermal LWIR sensor as well as a image intensifier with some sort of CCD or CMOS sensor behind it, then both are fused, hence the sensor fusion name, I see the many you tube video links coming from this website, here is an interesting link to see the fusion goggle in action

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRLpDtpgptc

    A color sensor such as this x27 would be ideal in this type of goggle, it would add color to the thermal scene,it would be able to be operated if needed in daytime and it would not be Pierced or damaged as the intensifier. I don't know if the fusion goggles are available to civilians, it may be a military only device. Sensor blending will definitely become more advanced and become more available commercially as time moves on, there are many commercial uses for it.

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