Tuesday, March 08, 2011

In-Stat: MIPI CSI-2 in More Than 70% of Consumer and Computing Devices with Image Sensors by 2016

Marketwire: In-Stat predicts MIPI CSI-2 penetration is to surpass 70% in computing and consumer electronic devices with image sensors by 2016. Smartphones and handsets will account for the largest percentage and highest growth rate of CSI-2 and CSI-3 penetration.

In-Stat expects over 225 million Tablet PC image sensors to ship using MIPI in 2016, with MIPI CSI-3 representing about 20% of these, and MIPI CSI-2 representing 80%.

"Proprietary interfaces prevent devices from different manufacturers from working together and result in industry fragmentation," says Jim McGregor, Chief Technology Strategist. "MIPI’s CSI-2 and CSI-3 provide the entire electronics industry, not just mobile devices, with a standard that is high-speed, low-power, cost-effective, and scalable."

7 comments:

  1. Not surprising. Well, what's new in this prediction. I don't know...

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  2. Cudos to the camera working group that wrote the spec :-)

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  3. @ "Well, what's new in this prediction. I don't know..."

    You are right, not so much new. I even think CSI-3 forecasts are too conservative.

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  4. QUESTION: Why are there no FPGAs that take MIPI in natively? We are still forced to build level shifters between the MIPI port and the FPGA, to send in a standard LVDS input... what is the best bench top capture solution out there for multi-lane MIPI?

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  5. what are the signaling levels then? the fpga lvds specs have very wide Vcm ranges and are capable to accept very low differential voltage inputs..

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  6. I think the issue is that MIPI runs in a low power single ended mode to send control information (slower) and then runs in a high speed differential mode for data transfer. Each of these two modes run and different levels, frequencies, single vs differential...

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  7. still not the slightest problem on FPGA's..

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