Friday, October 17, 2014

LensVector and Sunny Announce The World’s Smallest 5MP AF Camera

PR Web: LensVector and Sunny Opotech announce what they say is the world’s smallest 5MP autofocus camera, P5S10A, aimed to low cost smartphones. The P5S10A combines LensVector’s solid-state LV4519 autofocus with Sunny’s 3531 base lens and a small 5MP sensor in a compact size measuring 6.5 mm x 6.5 mm x 4.6mm. The module can fit both main cameras and high-end front facing cameras.

Our LV4519 autofocus device contains no moving parts, which is a huge step up from electro mechanical alternatives. We're also smaller, easier to integrate and require less power than other options,” said Howard Earhart, CEO at LensVector. “Through our relationship with a world-leading camera module supplier like Sunny, we’re creating a new generation of miniature autofocus cameras for the rapidly growing budget smartphone market.

Sunny Opotech is pleased to offer the world’s smallest autofocus camera, powered by LensVector’s LV4519 solid-state autofocus device,” said David Wang, GM at Sunny Opotech. “P5S10A was created to deliver high performance at lower costs for the rapidly growing smartphone market where size and affordability are critically important.

The camera is currently sampling and is expected to enter volume production in early 2015.

LensVector's Gen3 AF device spec, including the driver with integrated heater and temperature sensor:


In another news, LensVector founder, Tigran Galstian, received Canadian Ernest Manning Innovation Award for development liquid crystal technology to replace the mechanical focus in camera phones.

8 comments:

  1. Spectacular!
    The world has been craving a solid state solution for years, and it is now a reality!
    Congrats!

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  2. I wonder what the transmission is like. Normally with polarization optics you loose 50% of the available light right from the start...

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    1. We are not using polarizers, but two perpendicular layers of LC, so the transmission is >90% (typically 91-92%). TG

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    2. Ah, thank you. I guess I have worked to much with LCDs to come to such a simple but effective solution. Would also have helped to read the patent beforehand, that one explains it quite nicely (WO2009/146530 if anyone else is interested).

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  3. Wonder when a liquid crystal based zoom will appear. These lenses can be negative as well. But even with positive only lenses a zoom would be possible.

    By the way a 'liquid crystal' is definitely not solid state...

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    1. you are right. It should be called "motion-less"

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  4. There are no polarizers... the liquid crystal orientation causes a delay in the light passing through it. The polarization is irrelevant (or unwanted to act upon even).

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  5. There are two layers of LC in orthogonal orientation. The birefringence is compensated.

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