Monday, October 20, 2014

Omnivision Announces Two Automotive Sensors with Red-Clear Filters

PR Newswire: OmniVision announces additions to its portfolio of OmniHDR automotive sensors: the 1.3MP/60fps BSI OV10642 and the WVGA/60fps OV10625. Both the OV10642 and the OV10625 are said to deliver top-level sensitivity and HDR performance in their respective market segments. The sensors also use a special red-clear filter that is required for many forward-looking automotive applications. These benefits ADAS systems, including lane departure warning, blind spot detection and traffic signal detection, among others.

"As more automobiles adopt image sensor technology to enhance safety and the driving experience, the importance of high quality imaging and reliable sensing technology cannot be overstated," said Inayat Khajasha, senior product marketing manager for automotive products at OmniVision. "With industry-leading HDR and ultra-low light sensitivity, these sensors are capable of supporting highly advanced vehicle sensing systems deployed in the latest vehicle platforms."

The 1/2.6-inch 4.2um pixel-based OV10642 fits into a compact 7.4 x 7.2 mm package and supports 120dB HDR mode. The 1/3.2-inch 6um pixel-based WVGA OV10625 too delivers HDR of up to 120 dB and best-in-class low-light sensitivity of 15 V/Lux-sec and fits into one of the industry's most compact and efficient 7.3 x 7.8 mm package.

Both sensors are currently sampling and are expected to enter volume production in Q4 2014.

14 comments:

  1. What is the FWC with 15V/lux*s?

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  2. The V/(lux•sec) as a meassure of sensitivity has not any sense if isn't companied by the SNR or some other feature that determine the image quality.
    It's possible to obtain an arbitrarily high sensitivity and this doesn't means that the image quality is good or even acceptable for the application.

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  3. Are the 120dB reach for SNR>1 and no DR gaps (SNR holes)?

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    1. The 120dB is only a marketing language of OV. The real sensor has limited DR extension, just thinking about the crosstalk percentage between 2 pixels in a normal CIS to understand this. The DR extension can not go beyond the crosstalk percentage. If they add exposure control, then they will get all the artefacts for moving scene.
      They have to show a 5mLux image at 30fps like SONT did :)=

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  4. But a 120dB dynamic range is pretty impressive, no matter what one might think of the FWC or sensitivity.

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    1. Really no. It's relatevely easy to obtain an DR of 120dB using diferent techniques: several exposure times, several conversion gains or others.
      If the dynamic range is very high but the SNR is very poor or even lower than 0dB, the image is not good or even completly invalid for practical applications.

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    2. But the dynamic range of the lens would be at most 100 dB. So how can the system DR be larger than this?

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    3. What it's means DR of the lens? In my understanding, the lens hasn't a limited DR.

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    4. The dynamic range of lens is limited by "ghosting"; light reflecting through different surfaces in the lens elements and reduces contrast (i.e., obscuring low-light level details).

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  5. And what about performance SNR, DR, etc ... at 100°C which is one of the main challenge and requirement for those applications.

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  6. How did they achieve 120dB of DR, anyway?

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  7. They could have also quoted the intra scene dynamic range, which basically means that their sensor can capture a scene with 120dB of dynamic range information, without clipping or saturating the dark and bright areas respectively

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  8. It is scene dynamic range. Images might not be looking better or HDR-like in comparison with others even with 70dB claim. Too much post-processing to brighten the dark area.

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