Friday, September 25, 2015

SPI Color Night Vision Demos

SPI Corp publishes a dedicated page on its X27 color night vision camera with large number of Youtube videos, such as this one:



and another one:

23 comments:

  1. I've more and more feeling that all these videos be faked. The stars can be seen during daytime if a telescopic lens is used.

    On the first video, there is a lens flare which looks like a Sunset and also the long shadow of the tree confirms this. In this case, there is no star on the sky.

    On the second video, if a tele-objective lens is used, then stars can be seen with relatively high ambient light.

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    1. I presume the flare came from artificial lighting just to the right and up slightly. Probably too low for sunset.

      In the second video, the shadows of the bushes clearly move with the vehicle lighting. If there were significant sunlight (even just during twilight) those shows would be drowned out.

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    2. Presume te cooled tech, quite impressive

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    3. Iccd in color perhaps, these are real clips, the technology seems to be a mystery. Secret sauce within the Dsp algorithm

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    4. I am intrigued by these color night vision videos, My group has been seeking color night vision that's viable for defence apps for years, after looking at the following clip

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsRkm-YhJGM

      I am convinced these are indeed real, see the day like image quality of the camera panning to the ocean (this had me fooled because it looks like a day CCTV image) , and then the headlamps come into the frame, its obviously night time. I applaud SPI for this new sensor tech and would like to see me demos of this technology.

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  2. I don't think the video is faked, or if it was, it is an excellent job. Aside from the missing shot noise, everything seems sensible to me in the images.
    I think the real mystery is what is the "intensification" mechanism? Is it a quantum dot photoconductor?? Or in fact is this just the normal SOA that has become suddenly declassified? (I doubt it). Either way, it is fascinating to contemplate. I look forward to finding out in the future.

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    1. Dear Eric, what does SOA stand for?

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    2. Awesome resolution, I would say 2k

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  3. I suspect that this is the discontinued FLIR Tau CNV product that uses the Fairchild sCMOS sensor. See - http://www.flir.com/cores/display/?id=54460

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  4. These videos are faked. I work in low-light imaging and there are too many unanswered questions and quirks with the material and videos they present. The complete absence of shot-noise is one give away. The shadows show that there is still very sufficient light available for low light imaging. The lack of a laboratory type quantified setup also leaves questions with calibrated light levels. The first videos they showed were a joke with everyone wearing sunglasses in them. Then they twist their press release to make it seem like they are a major player on a DARPA program. They also have no real marketing material with the standard specs you release with these cameras.

    These guys are pedaling snake oil... they would have so many defense contracts and acquired by now if this was real.

    Stay away.

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  5. Amazing technology

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  6. Actually... if the image sensor is bad enough, then daylight performance will look this bad! that would explain the shadows and the sunglasses! :)

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  7. That is sweet image quality. Night vision In colour is brilliant

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  8. Looks very real, the Stars lit up 1000nm, looks like emccd with the gain pumped up to infinity

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  9. After watching this vid clip

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gtOsmdwX1TM

    I would have to conclude that it is some sort of new lll sensor that's doing a nice job at multiplying photons, probably expensive as all get go, put the video on HD setting it looks like 80 lp/mm quality. Eventually the days of the i2 tube will be gone, solid state tech will catch up and with proper engineering turn night into day, this will be available as a color night vision frature on your smart fone within 8 years

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  10. Real, and I am anticipating this technology to go viral soon. Congrats to the originator. Color night vision technology will be the go to tech for military and wf mt imaging tech

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  11. Looks like it's HbCMOS 1280x720 pixel array out of Japan (?) A few cameras are available with this same 7.1 micron array including one from Ikegami for broadcast use. Would like to identify the source of the sensor itself...

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  12. I have some comments on the videos. In the first one there is a reflection off the water which clearly shows a light source of unknown intensity. In the second video the orb in the sky, is that supposed to be the moon? If it is a star then that is some bad halo. If it is the moon then the logo on the FEDEX truck doesn't make any sense with moonlight illumination. Why, moonlight shifts the night sky spectrum to blue so blues get bluer and reds get orangy. In the video the blues in the logo get darker and the reds get browner.

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  13. Looks like typical night conditions with white lights in the background, could be a hybrid mix of emccd and hbcmos, pretty low noise considering its in color at night. Would like to see this in a portable or mounted packaging

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  14. Maybe it is a 4 sensor system with a prism to provide the color separation? One mono sensor with IR pass filter to provide the luminance information and the other three to provide the RGB color information. And of course very large pixels to be able to use integration time (30FPS).

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