Thursday, November 03, 2016

Leti and Pyxalis Develop Low Noise Image Sensor Readout

ElectronicsWeekly: CEA-Leti and PYXALIS announce a new technology that lowers readout noise for image sensors down to 0.5e- and dramatically improves low-light image sensing capabilities.

The new technology, called Owly-eyed, is based on a patented electrical architecture of the pixel readout that can be integrated in image sensors. It has been adapted for PYXALIS, which will offer it in its next-generation image sensors.

In the Owly-eyed technology demonstrator, a sub-0.5e− rms temporal read noise has been achieved on a VGA format CMOS image sensor implemented in a standard CMOS process. The low-noise performance is achieved exclusively through circuit optimization without any process refinements.

In this common lab with PYXALIS, we’ve developed a low-noise image technology that provides state-of-the-art advanced imaging for next-generation applications in a wide range of markets and industries,” said Marie Semeria, Leti’s CEO. “This CMOS-based device, which can be adapted for multiple uses, is another strong example of how Leti’s broad technology innovations make our partners more competitive in their industries.

Leti’s Owly-eyed technology is a major improvement in low-noise imaging,” said PYXALIS CEO Philippe Rommeveaux. “Combined with our capacity to offer advanced sensors with high digital integration and high dynamic range, it will allow us to establish a new performance standard in image sensors that address the growing demand for low-light applications in the surveillance, biomedical, science, defense and aerospace markets.

2 comments:

  1. Cool. So, where is the photon counting histogram that demonstrates photoelectron counting if the read noise is below 0.5e- rms? Easy enough to generate and easy enough to verify the read noise by just looking at the PCH.

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    1. This work makes certainly reference to this paper :
      http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7505917/
      where the readnoise was 0.5 electrons, so not "sub-electron" enough to see peaks in a low light histogram.

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