Friday, November 04, 2011

Panavision Imaging Announces Fast GS HDR Sensor

Panavision Imaging (PVI, former Panavision SVI), launches DYNAMAX-11 (D11) CMOS sensor featuring global shutter technology for both indoor and outdoor industrial imaging applications. PVI’s new D11 technology platform is promised to be a basis for a full image sensor product portfolio, targeting markets such as Machine Vision, Intelligent Traffic Systems, Security, Surveillance, Life Sciences, Scientific Imaging, Biometrics and HDTV camcorders.

The D11 3.2MP/120fps imager features a 5.0um pixel, 2/3” optical format with regions of interest (ROI) in a 16:9 HDTV format. A distributed ADC (D/AD) eliminates gain variations between rows and the closed loop feedback of Active Column Sensor (ACS) allows for high gain per column. The D/AD allows for variable bit depth from 8 to 12 bits. HDR mode operates by utilizing two data words per row, for dual gain or dual integration. The dual gain or dual integration data can be kept separate on the dual words for proper post processing for enhanced image rendering.

Panavision Imaging’s patented Active Column Sensor (ACS) technology has demonstrated advantages over competing imaging technologies such as CCD and CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology,” said Jeff Zarnowski, CTO of PVI.

Dynamax 11 allows for either single row or dual row readout. Single row readout is utilized for the lowest power consumption, and dual row readout is used for higher speed and longer line times for dual gain per row or Correlated Multi-Sampling (CMS). CMS can be used to further reduce noise, add gain or achieve greater bit depth.

With the four row readout, which allows 120 frame per second operation with full resolution, this new D11-3.2Mp imager is a perfect fit for applications requiring high speed,” said Jim Tan, Vice President of Worldwide Sales and Marketing of PVI. “Also, the D11-3.2Mp imager has been designed with more than 120dB scene wide dynamic range which is ideal for outdoor imaging applications, such as Intelligent Traffic Systems.

Other Panavision Imaging products include Dynamax 35 Ultra - a 35MP sensor capable to operate at 30fps at full resolution or at 120fps at 6 times of HDTV resolution. It's based on XtremePIX technology that was presented few years ago as the next generation ACS.

13 comments:

  1. Will can we find this patent?

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  2. No pinned-photodiodes?

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  3. No image neither?

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  4. I just find this funny these days. Who are these guys trying to kid? From the XtremePIX technology link above:

    "The OLD WAY, CMOS APS Sensors.

    Forget CMOS Active Pixel Sensors, with their complex amplifier per pixel designs. Complex sensor designs complicate your image – too much noise, not enough sensitivity, poor dynamic range, large optical format, power hungry, ……..…

    The list of ‘bad’ goes on and on.

    Active Pixel Sensors use an amplifier per pixel architecture. An amplifier can be made from a single, very large transistor or FET, or can be made using multiple transistors. The amplifiers purpose is to drive the image signal up the column of pixels to the readout circuitry.

    However, that amplifier, from an engineering point of view, is a very poor one. It does not have feedback, a built in self-control, to control its gain or amplification. This means that each pixel can have a different response to light, further corrupting your image.

    Along with that amplifier, each pixel has two additional transistors that act like switches, one to select that pixel for readout, and the other to reset the pixel to get it ready to read the next image. When these switches turn on and off, they add more noise to your image. "

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  5. This is a real American style Marcom!

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  6. "The OLD WAY, CMOS APS Sensors.
    >How quickly things change

    Forget CMOS Active Pixel Sensors, with their complex amplifier per pixel designs.
    >Complex?
    Complex sensor designs complicate your image – too much noise,
    >because sub 2e- rms is still too high...?
    not enough sensitivity
    >because BSI has only 99% fill factor
    , poor dynamic range
    >because 120 dB+ is not enough
    large optical format,
    >because 1.1 um pixels are so large
    power hungry,
    >uh...
    ……..…

    The list of ‘bad’ goes on and on.

    Active Pixel Sensors use an amplifier per pixel architecture. An amplifier can be made from a single, very large transistor or FET, or can be made using multiple transistors. The amplifiers purpose is to drive the image signal up the column of pixels to the readout circuitry.

    However, that amplifier, from an engineering point of view, is a very poor one. It does not have feedback
    >because it does not need it,
    a built in self-control, to control its gain or amplification.
    >because it does not need it
    This means that each pixel can have a different response to light
    >but they don't
    , further corrupting your image.
    >not usually.

    Along with that amplifier, each pixel has two additional transistors that act like switches, one to select that pixel for readout, and the other to reset the pixel to get it ready to read the next image. When these switches turn on and off, they add more noise to your image. "
    >only if you are really really bad designer.

    Sounds like someone had trouble building a state of the art CMOS APS sensor and is feeling sorry for themselves...

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  7. Is Photo-diode current (dis)charging column capacitance to convert current to voltage? Then, I wonder how sensitivity numbers compare with state-of-the-art APS?

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  8. How does Panavision ACS sensor perform global shutter operation?

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  9. they have shown the GS NDR at Vision Stuttgart. The performance is poor.

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  10. Guys, you are not good at electronics design! A source follower is a 100% voltage feedbacked amplifier!!!! Haha

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  11. All smoke & mirrors? What is suppose to be so big about ACS?

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  12. You can find more details about the ACS at:

    http://www.panavisionimaging.com/PDF/pviacsvaps.pdf

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  13. Who are Panavision imaging guys?

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