Saturday, June 15, 2013

All About CMOS Sensors in 75 Slides

Taiwan National Chiao Tung University published a nice CMOS image sensor course materials covering pretty much all important things in just 75 slides, written by Chia-Ming Tsai. There is also 58-slide long CCD course on the same page.

Update: As written in comments, most of the material in the CMOS and CCD slides is not original and, actually, copied from Albert Theuwissen's and Stanford University courses.

15 comments:

  1. Albert TheuwissenJune 15, 2013 at 5:29 PM

    I am VERY DEEPLY disappointed to see what is published here. The CCD part has at least 50 % of the figures literally copied from my courses without any reference, the CMOS part has many figures literally copied from my courses without reference. BTW, all my material is protected by the copyright. I also recognize a lot of Stanford material (and others !) literally copied without reference. I could not imagine that someone is daring to put this into the public domain.

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  2. Outrageous! Most of This material is the life and sweat of prof. Theuwissen. This matter should be raised against the university. In many countries plagiarism can even result in loss of position in academia.

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  3. really sad to see this ! shameful and regrettable !

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  4. It looks like this material is no longer available.

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  5. Too bad I couldn't download it but from the different comments it is better that it's not available anymore.

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  6. This could have been such a useful and interesting read..... Academia Copy right kind sucks

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  7. Is there any chance of posting the Stanford copyrighted slides? They sound very useful.

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  8. there's a saying about software in Taiwan: you buy one copy and that is a site license for the entire island. Intellectual property respect isn't a big trend over there.

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  9. Disagree. This is an unfortunate misconduct of one person. For the rest of us in Taiwan, we respect the copy rights and intellectual properties just like everyone else.

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    1. I must say that the level of intellectual property "respect" in Taiwan is no where near the same level found in the US. Otherwise, one prestigious university professor mentioned in the post will not post such material on the web. Believe me it is not simply "misconduct of one person".

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  10. Hmm, list of things I am yet to fully appreciate continues to grow: patents on medication, strong copyrighting of educational material,

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  11. What, short of enrollment in Stanford, is the best way to learn the knowledge in the powerpoint slides?

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    1. *Eric Fossum's publications and in particular: http://ericfossum.com/Presentations/Presentations.htm
      *Albert Theuvissen' Blog under Imaging Links, this site.
      *Consult James R. Janesick, Photon Transfer (SPIE Press Monograph Vol. PM170)
      *El Gamal Research Group Publications, Imaging Links, this site.
      *Bart Van Zeghbroeck, Principles of Semiconductor Devices, this site.
      *Junichi Nakamuura, Image Sensors and Signal Processing for Digital Still Cameras.

      I may be wrong, but I think this issue here was probably not so much the actual information, but failure to attribute and acknowledge the hard work that went into compiling it.

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  12. On the topic of attribution honest in academia, I found slides (http://www.harvestimaging.com/pubdocs/59a_vlsi-tsa.pdf) from "2001 Albert J.P. Theuwissen, Philips Semiconductors Image Sensors" and then a copied version from Yale's website (https://classes.yale.edu/04-05/enas627b/lectures/EENG427l07DigitalImaging.pdf) which only attributes Theuwissen. So I guess it was okay that Philips Semi got cut out for use in a US institution.

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