Wednesday, June 08, 2016

Photometrics Doesn't Miss Any Photon, with GPixel's Help

BusinessWire: Photometrics and Gpixel announced the release of the Photometrics Prime 95B Scientific CMOS camera featuring scientific-grade CMOS sensor available with 95% QE, the GSENSE400BSI-TVISB. It BSI technology with 11um large pixels and low-noise characteristics to maximize light collection.

6 comments:

  1. It seems that a lot of image sensor manufacturers look to implement higher dynamic range into their products.
    A question I often ask myself is "what applications really need that high linear dynamic range within one image"? in scientific applications there might be a lot of applications. But in my (for sure very limited) point of view in industrial machine vision - we rarely demand for more than 8bit/pixel linear image information. We require a high dynamic range within the application range of the camera (so low overall sensitivity with highly reflective objects or when there is demand to have longer exposure times (e.g. to "filter" vibration) - and for example higher overall sensitivity when there are lower reflective objects to be inspected). In our case "lower quantum efficiency" would often be an advantage - something like an "electronic ND-filter" we could enable for certain applications. We dont need "90db" within 1 image, we might need it within the application range of the camera. In industrial applications surprisingly image sensors often are too light sensitive. It would be cool if there were offerings also with "electronically selectable lower efficiency". There is for example an interesting feature in the Sony Pregius line where you can do 'multiple exposure' for one frame, split the exposure time over several sub-exposures. So if you require 20ms exposure periode but for some reasons want to grab only 5% of the light you can make 10 sub exposures with 0,1ms each

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    1. In fact it is a big issue in television, cinema, art-photography and consumer (smartphone) applications. Indeed television and cinema are aiming for HDR and HFR solutions (i.e. Dolby HDR standard). Also in the field of cinema and art photography a high dynamic range (as well as high pixel bit/depth) is desirable, it helps to keep information in shadows as well as in highlights.

      best chris

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  2. Great Achievement and Bravo !

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  3. Whose sensor do they use? This is clearly not Fairchild's sCMOS. And Photometrics does not make sensors.

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    1. uh, the clue is in the post's headline I think.

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    2. Any videos or pics of the performance?

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