Sunday, October 25, 2015

Invisage Announces Release of Short Film Shot By its QuantumCinema Sensor

InVisage announces the release of “Prix”, a short film shot entirely with InVisage’s QuantumFilm smartphone camera sensor. The film is said to capture "a stunning level of detail despite dynamic lighting environments and shooting fast-moving subjects outdoors. This quality is made possible thanks to InVisage’s QuantumFilm, a quantum dot camera sensor technology."

Today, filmmakers of all types have access to HD-quality cameras through their smartphones,” said InVisage President and CEO Jess Lee. “However, achieving truly cinematic quality can be difficult without professional-grade cameras. Our expanded dynamic range capability is a major step forward in allowing smartphones to capture the tiniest of details across a wide range of lighting conditions. The results can be seen in ‘Prix,’ a charming short film about children who make their own technological innovations.


Prix film has been published on Youtube, while another Youtube video talks about the QuantumFilm advantages and gives a short Invisage office tour:



Update: Phys.org posts a collection of responses from different web sites on the QuantumCinema technology.

10 comments:

  1. So cheesy it hurts! First of all... they say sillicon and show a side by side comparison with an uknown horrible looking thing, which looks like the worst sensor chip in the worst no-name knockoff chinese mobile phone.

    But... if the movie was shot on their quantum sensor which has the typical size of a smarpthone sensor then I'm really impressed.. but if it was your typical 2/3" chip or god forbid M3/4 or APS-C (even 8mm size) then i'm only slightly amused while slightly bored

    Does anyone think it might have been a mobile phone size chip due to the weird softness of the lens? Or 8mm or 16mm lens?

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    1. Well the behind the scene's footage on the facebook page actually shows a small phone sized device attached to the big camera rigs so its quite a possibility. That and the fact that I doubt they've made anything larger that isn't part of some prototype at present. So there is some hope. Is suspect there will be a hidden issue with this which will come to light (pun intended) in the first consumer device (if any). Most likely it will break down over time due to exposure to UV or other light.

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    2. Around 2:55 it looks like their "conventional CMOS" sensor was an iPhone6-class camera.

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  2. it's good to see the real images from their technology! But for mobile market, it's maybe too late now.

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  3. It's very interesting. The image quality has a lot to be desired though. Overall the clip looks soft, while the highlight is preserved but it looks flat, as if from a partially graded log file. Is it 8bit color?
    Having a working global shutter is definitely a major step fwd.

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  4. They should have used Fuji-film, instead of Kodak stock. It has a significantly higher DR than Kodak stock. But it might have matched or outperformed the Quantum BS...

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    1. As it is the Kodak seems to outperform quantum film. In fact my reaction to the samples was "Damn film looks great". No arriflex comparisions here.

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  5. Any one knows if the image is digitally corrected before display, for example to correct the non-uniformity propice to such device?

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  6. global shutter or rolling shutter may dominate image quality.

    Does any one knows more detail ??

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  7. What is with grass on all QuantumFilm flicks? Poor global shutter efficiency, leakage, lag, or something else?

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