Tuesday, November 09, 2010

Aptina Announces 1.2MP 115dB HDR Automotive Sensor

Business Wire: Aptina announced MT9M024 automotive image sensor. The 1.2MP, 1/3-inch optical format sensor features high DR of greater than 115dB, , 720p/60fps HD video, full motion compensation and DR-Pix technology that enhances the performance of the pixel in very low light conditions. Aptina DR-Pix technology combines two modes of operation in one pixel design – low conversion gain mode for large charge handling capacity in bright scenes and a high conversion gain mode with increased sensitivity and low read noise for low-light scenes.

The surround-view ready MT9M024 also targets automotive forward-facing solutions like lane departure warning (LDW) and traffic sign recognition (TSR).

The AEC-Q100 qualified sensor comes in a 9x9mm iBGA package that meets -40C to +105C operating temperatures. The sensor offers additional features such as on-chip AE, statistics engine, context switching, temperature sensor, parallel and serial outputs and auto black level calibration.

The MT9M024 is currently sampling and will be in production starting Q3 2011.

5 comments:

  1. Production starting Q3 2011?!!
    That's year from now. Omnivision has the HDR OV10630 available today.
    Is Aptina really still in business?

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  2. This is remarkably similar to the MT9M021/023 family; perhaps just a tweak on that design. Here's hoping that they have better luck hitting their production schedule on this chip than they have on the 021/023!

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  3. Says the guy from OV! You have to remember that OV is where it is now just because of iPhone
    It is scary to rely one one major customer only
    And that Aptina is still #3 in unit shipments so they won't die as fast as OV wish they would even if they do

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  4. OVT is becoming kind of Intel of sensors and Aptina like AMD :P

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  5. No, Intel is market leader with class and substantially contributes to the US economy.

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