Wednesday, July 08, 2015

Pair of Image Sensors in Every Pair of Glasses

Israel-based Deep Optics presents its intelligent multifocal glasses featuring a pair of image sensor in each pair of glasses. A Youtube video shows how it works:



The company's chart presents the ophthalmic multifocal lens progress over the years:

6 comments:

  1. These are not "The first dynamic focal eyeglasses ever created". I worked with the now-defunct PixelOptics (whose assets were purchased by Mitsui Chemical, Inc. in 2014) on a similar product back in 2006.

    I don't know if they ever sold any (I moved on from the company that was working with them), but they did show the product at CES in 2012.

    https://youtu.be/9LVTDYN9AYQ

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I knew this, but it's not the same. PixelOptics glasses do not have image sensors, and hence are less interesting for us. Other than emPower glasses, they also worked on eFocus contact lenses.

      BTW, PixelOptics has licensed its liquid crystal focusing technology from eVision. I'm not sure if eVision is alive today, but its web site is still on-line:

      http://evisionoptics.com/index.html

      Delete
    2. During the concept phase with PixelOptics, we did look at using stereo sensors for object range tracking, but we rejected it as it would only work when the user looked through the center of the lens.

      The Deep Optics approach is to track the pupillary distance. That's very clever. I do assume, however, that it would require some per-user calibration (maybe simply focusing at infinity and maybe at a known macro position).

      Delete
  2. I'm thinking about this all the time after passing 50. I've made a progress lensive, but initial adaptation is hard. But suddenly after 2 years, the adaptation comes and now I feel quite well with my progressive lens. But I will definitely buy this one if it's available with reasonable price !

    -yang ni

    ReplyDelete
  3. What is the latency? And how about power consumption? Every time you move your head, the focal length will keep getting adjusted.. looks like a continuous process.. so how is the drain on the battery? And is that ever changing focal length not creating discomfort for a user?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would imagine given the DOF of the eye that they would only change focus when there is a dramatic change in range (the eye also retains some accommodation) so there wouldn't be a continual focus hunt. Those image sensors running the whole time will drain the battery but it should still last longer than a smartphone.

      Delete

All comments are moderated to avoid spam.