Tuesday, December 14, 2021

Samsung Presentation of 50MP All-Directional PDAF Sensor with 2.2V Pixel Supply

Hot Chips publishes Samsung its August 2021 conference materials, including Samsung ISOCELL GN2 presentation "World Largest Mobile Image Sensor with All Directional Phase Detection Auto Focus Function" by Sukki Yoon:


7 comments:

  1. Why so many companies use 'Staggered-HDR'? No patent on this? I remembered Johannes presented this on IISW2009 when he was still at Aptina, then he presented again when he moved to OmniVision. and I believe Sony also use it, but they called it 'Digital Overlap', and SmartSens from China also use it, and Samsung is also using it?

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    1. Stagger HDR is not a good way for HDR. Companies use Stagger HDR just because this method is easy. It has many drawback such as LED filker & bad dark performance.

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    2. This rolling shutter HDR was invented at NASA/JPL around the mid 90's by Orly Yadid-Pecht and myself (US Patent No. 6,115,065). I also think most big companies licensed this IP as part of a portfolio from Caltech. This method works well for many applications, but also has its limitations.

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    3. Eric, your patent was issued on 2000. So basically just expired? Maybe others start to use it because of this? :)

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  2. Albert Theuwissen - Harvest ImagingDecember 14, 2021 at 7:42 PM

    I quickly checked the ppt presentation and saw on page 11/22 that 2 photodiodes in parallel are connected to the same transfer gate. Interesting new concept ;-)

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  3. What is the purpose of such sharing?
    Is this for binning? Or for phase AF?

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    1. I guess the two photodiodes are the ones that are used for PDAF, in that case they both need a separate transfer gate to the floating diffusion. You do need to separately read the information of both photodiodes in the PDAF mode, in the normal image capturing mode, you can bin their contents on the floating diffusion.

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